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Posts tagged guam culture and history.

sumahi:

I didn’t make this, but some of the coolest people on Guam did. Me and alot of my friends are in the video. It asks a question more people should, “Are you down for the Movement?” Or what Movement, if any are you part of? If you can’t think of anything that you are a part of that is moving, you should probably do something about that.

Good song, good video, great message. Looking for more from these guys…

06.29.12 10

sumahi:

My submission to the White House’s “What’s Your Story?” Challenge.

In it I discuss the Heritage Hikes that I organize for the group We Are Guahan.

Good stuff from Michael! It’s so nice to hear some Chamorro spoken, too!

01.14.12 14
Heritage Hikes: I Kantan i Latte Siha, Part II

After exploring the jungle and its magnificent latte sites, many We Are Guahan heritage hikers settled down on the beach at Shark’s Hole. And many headed to Lost Pond! I’d heard about this place for a long time and was excited to check it out, especially after so many lovely days at Shark’s Hole.

The jungle path was oh-so-jungly!

Prickly roots.

Thick roots.

Lost Pond! One of only two freshwater pools on island. (I believe.)

Mossy goodness on the way back toward the beach.

Nice tall papaya tree on the edge of the jungle.

CLIMB ME!

08.19.11 3
Heritage Hikes: I Kantan i Latte Siha, Part I

I was so grateful that the awesome folks at We Are Guahan were hosting heritage hikes on a Sunday. I’d had such a good time learning about Guam’s history, present and future back in November at that round of Heritage Hikes. Since then, I was usually at my day job on Saturdays and really felt I was missing out. No longer!

We met up at Tanguisson Beach Park and then trekked along the beaches to the entrance of the jungle in the ancient village of Hila’an. Miget painted a fantastic picture of how this area might have been when it was populated. This was of course part of the land that Guam just got back from Uncle Sam. A good start…

After asking permission, we split into two groups and headed into the jungle to find latte sites. They were everywhere! I had that mystical feeling like I always do around them.

There’s Leevin leading the way!

We found lusong, too! Think mortar/metate.

I love coral in the jungle…

More latte! As always, click through any pic for even more!

Big ups to We Are Guahan yet again for showing people all the different layers of beauty on this island…

08.18.11 0

Team Guahan is blowing me away!

07.24.11 0

Amazing! Hat tip to Ms. Tom for the heads up.

07.24.11 0
Liberation Day is almost here

The info above comes to us from the fine folks at Guma’Famoksaiyan. Can’t wait to stop by tomorrow and find out more.

It was fun to drive along Marine Corps tonight and see all the die-hards setting up and hanging out. Looking forward to tomorrow!

07.20.11 0
Golden Week with the Tanis: Scooting Down South

I suggested to the Tanis that renting scooters and heading down south would be an awesome thing to do. And it was! I stole the idea from my December scooter trip of course. We scooted down to Agat and checked out the Taleyfac Spanish bridge, part of the transportation network that once extended up and down the coast.

The mangoes were growing!

We had to pull over at the Cetti Bay Overlook. Check out KJ’s sweet helmet!

Of course we swung by Fort Soledad in Umatac.

Luckily, my cannon buddy Kate is always willing to climb on some artillery with me…

Speaking of climbing, KJ was happy to climb aboard Betsey, the ever-friendly carabao…

…while Kate checked out the scene from the horn end.

After Umatac, we rounded the island and came across Cross-Island Road, where I ran out of gas. KJ sped off in search of gas, while Kate (in solidarity!) and I pushed our scooters up the hill (followed by additional drama of getting back to the rental place with a flat tire). NOBODY stopped to offer help, but soon we were scooting back home. Moral of the story: check the tires, check the gas, check out the scenery.

07.19.11 10
Liberation Day is coming!

I realize I’m still catching up on posts from long ago, but it was a busy spring here!

Guam is in the throes of the Liberation Day frenzy this week. The Fourth of July came and went with nary a mention besides the 4 minutes of fireworks, but this seems like the island-wide holiday I’d been looking forward to. (Especially since I’d been cheated out of any fun for le quatorze juillet!) Canopies are going up on Marine Corps already and the parade isn’t until Thursday. Look for more photos after that or when, you know, I get caught up with my Japanese friends being here and our diving trip to Palau…

The photo above is from a tragic accident during last year’s festivities.

The PDN has a list of events and a historical chronology.  Here’s the Wiki on the Battle of Guam and Josie of Latitude 13 posted some great pics here a few years ago.

07.19.11 0
Side Trip to Saipan: CNMI Museum

I took a break from the heat of the day to visit the CNMI Museum, something I was disappointed I didn’t have time for on the last trip. There’s nothing like this on Guam, and although the collections were NMI-based, a lot of the history overlaps with our little piece of the Marianas Islands.

It was definitely worth checking out, and it was great to have the small museum to myself. Housed in a historic hospital (from when Saipan was a Japanese outpost), it traces the history of the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas from Carolinian and Chamorro arrival through Japanese times and WWII and on to the covenant/trust territory era. There were also some great prints and translations of the Freycinet explorations. I picked up some fantastic local art in the gift shop, also worth a visit. As usual with learning about history, it just leaves me wanting more…

07.15.11 3
Zoom I took this shot down south, the location of which is best left unsaid because it’s very cool and there’s no need for any tattletaling and covering up.
According to my super awesome Chamorro language master contact, this translates in English as:
Awake! Stand! Rise!
Although it was strange as a professional translator to ask a linguist to translate for free, it’s a good cause. Angel Santos, one of Guam’s most important activists, is the man pictured, who you may remember from the post about my trip to Latte Stone Park.
I’m a big fan of stencil art in general, and that of an assertively rebellious nature really does it for me. I’d love to know the artist, but in the meantime, ask yourself what you’re doing today to be awake, to stand, and to rise.

I took this shot down south, the location of which is best left unsaid because it’s very cool and there’s no need for any tattletaling and covering up.

According to my super awesome Chamorro language master contact, this translates in English as:

Awake! Stand! Rise!

Although it was strange as a professional translator to ask a linguist to translate for free, it’s a good cause. Angel Santos, one of Guam’s most important activists, is the man pictured, who you may remember from the post about my trip to Latte Stone Park.

I’m a big fan of stencil art in general, and that of an assertively rebellious nature really does it for me. I’d love to know the artist, but in the meantime, ask yourself what you’re doing today to be awake, to stand, and to rise.

06.26.11 3
Back Down Umatac Way

Umatac is really one of my favorite villages on Guam. The Professor and I had driven down there before, but there’s always something to draw us back. In this case, scenery and Japanese tourists riding carabao!

There’s a dive spot down here, but I’m not sure where…

Fort Soledad, home of those great cannons.

I do believe this is Betsey, cousin of Lucy.

Everyone loves a nice carabao!

06.13.11 9
Santa Cruz Shrine in Piti

I’d passed the signs for this shrine many, many times before I made The Professor pull over one warm day a while back. Even though I could kind of figure out what was going on by reading the detail of the cross’s structure, I had to rely on Guampedia for more detail:

Santa Cruz Shrine
A small shrine with a cross is located near the southern border of the municipality of Piti. On a narrow road in the jungle off Marine Corps Drive, near Sumay Grill, the shrine today has a small shelter for those in the village who make the annual trek to honor the cross. After the Piti-Agat road was rebuilt by the U.S. Navy in 1908-09, the shrine was constructed to bless the road, and the swamp around it is known as “the Swamp of the Immaculate Virgin.”

They have an elaborate entry on our village, and I’ll need a bit more time to finish exploring even this tiny place. I’m pretty excited about the guns, though, so I’ll be saving those for later…

06.12.11 1
Latte Stone Park

I was afraid that Latte Stone Park would be kind of like a zoo for latte, but it made for a lovely afternoon visit. There was even that stirring of ancient and powerful feelings that I associate with latte.

The click-through on this picture might be clearer, but, as always, Guampedia does a great job of providing resources about latte.

This park is part of the Hagåtña Heritage Walking Trail, only part of which I’ve actually completed. How embarrassing. 

"People deserve nothing less."

06.12.11 1
Two Lovers’ Point

The Professor and I have driven past the turn-off for Two Lovers’ Point in Dededo many times, but we had always been too eager to get to Tanguisson Beach Park to dive or Sharks’ Hole to snorkel. We’d also never been too eager to check it out since it’s a Japanese tourist trap, but I did know that this is the the site of a Guam legend, so I figured it was worth a detour at least once.

To distract you from the obvious apostrophe issue going on here, I’ll let you read Guampedia's take on the legend that draws so many thousands of Japanese tourists. Part of that draw might of course be the view, which ain’t bad at all…

We didn’t actually pay the $5 to enter the outermost point, but the idea was clear. And we saw a wedding (haoles actually) along with plenty of Japanese tourists. Another box checked.

06.12.11 0